EveryDay Leaners

Recognizing the power of everyday learning moments

"The most important people in a child's life are that child's parents and teachers. That means parents and teachers are the most important people in the world."  ~ Fred Rogers

You can make a difference in your child's development!

We can help you do that.

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We all know that education and learning to read in school is important. But learning and literacy skills begin long before that--even in infancy.  The ability to learn is established in early childhood first through relationships with parents and caregivers. This ability is expanded through everyday opportunities provided by parents and caregivers to develop learning skills

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Relationships

A child's learning is enhanced in a loving, safe, and predictable environment, and they are able to develop a sense of security and self-control. Responsiveness from and connection with a parent or caregiver are essential for a child to learn.

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Skills

A child develops skills in early learning as parents and caregivers talk about numbers, shapes, patterns and comparisons during everyday activities and help them recognize opportunities to learn in all aspects of their lives.

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Exploration

A child develops confident thinking and discovery, parents and caregivers can encourage curiosity by making learning and exploring a part of play.

Most parents know they can help their child's developlment, but they don't know where to find the resources

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How can I help the children in my life learn and build literacy through everyday moments right now?

Step 1: Become intentional in everyday activities

Look for opportunities to respond to your child's needs and create a safe and loving environment. Take time each day during regular activities to talk to your child and point out shapes, numbers or patterns. Help your children find the joy in reading and exploring. Just begin to incorporate these ideas into what you are already doing.

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Step 2: Download our parent activity guide

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Our parent activity guide gives you the tools to understand the building blocks for learning and literacy. There are also easy and fun activities you can do with your child at different ages and stages of development to help enhance their learning abilities.

Step 3: Join a Ready to Learn class or playgroup

Our Ready to Learn classes and playgroups give you a chance to connect with other parents and caregivers while learning skills and activities to build your child's development.

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Step 4: Donate books or build a Little Free Library

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Help low-income families build their own home libraries by donating books that will be distributed in title one schools, local nonprofit agencies, and other programs. You can also encourage literacy and learning by starting a Little Free Library in your own neighborhood.

Step 5: Request a speaker

Our speakers come to your parent groups, workplace, child care centers, religious congregation or nonprofit to talk about early childhood learning and literacy and what you can do to help. Most speakers need about 50-60 minutes but can customize their presentation and time to your needs.

Request a Speaker
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Step 6: Support community services

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We have partnered with community organizations that also support early childhood literacy and education. You can help children in our community by donating to these organizations.

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"It doesn't matter how many interventions we give a child—if their core needs to feel safe, connected, and confident aren't being met, you'll find it difficult to help that child. When those needs are met, children are remarkably resilient."

- Barbara Leavitt, MPA, founder of Help Me Grow Utah

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"This approach is different from most other ones out there. It empowers parents. It empowers the child. If I could magically wish for one thing, I would wish for parents, on a daily or weekly basis, to look at their kids and ask themselves 'what can I do this week to help improve and facilitate my children's sense of safety, their connections, and their competence?'"

-Dr. Matt Swenson, child psychiatrist, Intermountain Healthcare

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"I use this framework every day with my grandchildren. I used to focus on a sort of carrot and stick approach--but when I ask myself instead, 'what needs aren't met in this child?' I find that I'm more compassionate, a better listener, and ultimately a more effective grandparent."

Jack Holmes, 6 kids, 28 grandkids, and 2 great-grandkids